2004 Rule Change Proposal

Author: David Paraskevas
APBA #: 10782

Date: 9/25/04

Note: Proposals must be submitted to the Inboard Chairman by October 1 ,2004 to be considered. Save and E-mail completed form to ; robin.shane@verizon.net

Check all that apply:

General Safety Rule
General Racing Rule
Stock Class Technical Rule           X
Modified Class Technical Rule

Effected Class: Jersey Speed Skiff

Specific Rule Information:

Rule number:              Rule 54 - JERSEY SPEED SKIFF CLASS; Section 54.1.8
Page number of rule:   Page 56

Effected Rule:

The rudder shall extend a minimum of 13-3/4 inches below the bottom of the boat, measured off the true bottom (excluding any cavitation plate adjustments).

The leading edge of the rudder must not be ahead of the trailing edges of the propeller.

Proposed rule:

Add to existing rule the following:

Only a single (1) rudder may be used. The rudder must be installed through a gland or rudder port mounted through the bottom of the hull forward of the transom. ................................................ and must be a minimum of 2 inches forward of the transom.

Complete Rule with proposed additions:

Only a single (1) rudder may be used. The rudder must be installed through a gland or rudder port mounted thru the bottom of the hull forward of the transom. The rudder shall extend a minimum of 13-3/4 inches below the bottom of the boat, measured off the true bottom (excluding any cavitation plate adjustments). The leading edge of the rudder must not be ahead of the trailing edges of the propeller and must be a minimum of 2 inches forward of the transom.


Reason for change:

To keep the hull and rigging consistent with a traditional style lapstrake runabout.

Pros: Prevents hybrid development of the boat, i.e., crossing hydro technology with a runabout. Outboard rudders are not necessary for improved handling characteristics over conventional inboard runabout styles. Although some improvement in straightaway speeds have been realized from use of the outboard rudder design, it is generally seen as inferior to conventional styles in turning abilities.
Although my first reason for removal of the outboard rudder from skiffs stems from my traditionalist values for the class, a secondary case concerning the safety aspect of outboard rudders on skiffs can also be made. It is a well know fact among race boat designers and builders that more length is required for an outboard rudder in order to acheive the same turning capabilities as an inboard rudder. Since the original rudder length rule was soley intended for an inboard rudder set up, use of an outboard rudder in essence circumvents the intent of both the original and the current safety based rule. The real bottom line here though is that the outboard rudder has no place in a traditional stock inboard runabout.

Cons: Some owners will have to change their existing set ups to comply. Four boats out of the twenty boats currently making up the active boats list use an outboard rudder set up.